Best Golf Irons For Mid Handicappers in 2019

photo of a set of golf irons

If you’re in a hurry and just want to find the Best Golf Irons for Mid Handicappers in 2019, then we recommend the Mizuno JPX 919 Forged.

When you first start playing golf, you play for the experience and the camaraderie of spending a day with someone that you care about. It does not matter if you spray balls all over the place, pick your ball up and giver yourself an 8 on most holes, or lose 15 balls per round. It is just fun. Until you realize there is something else to it, and you can control the ball and have even more fun while focusing on your game. When this happens your game can only improve as much as your equipment, and it is time to find the best golf irons for mid handicappers.

In this article, we’re going to be reviewing the following irons:

Irons for a Mid Handicapper

It is time to purchase new irons when you realize your clubs are holding you back from your potential. Two sure signs of needing new clubs are:

  1. When you look down at your club and realize you just do not like them.

If you have been golfing for a while, then you know the difference between clubs that feel you with confidence and clubs that you are just using because they are there. If you have never felt this and you consistently break 90, then you are probably using the wrong clubs.

  1. When your clubs are old and out of date.

These two things may happen at the same time and they may not. Golf technology changes consistently, but like anything else, technology does not matter if you stink. If your game has started improving and you notice that there are phrases being used to describe golf clubs that you have never heard before, then you are probably using old or out of date clubs.

If this describes you, then read the following information about the best golf irons for mid handicappers in 2019, and it will help you decide which irons are best for your game. Remember, golf technology will not help you if you cannot play, but if you are breaking 100 every time, 90 consistently, and you sometimes sniff 80, then you may just be a good set of irons away from consistency.

Features To Look For In Golf Irons For Mid Handicappers

As a mid handicap golfer, these are the things that you want your clubs to offer.

Distance

You have learned how to hit the ball straight, and maybe even draw the ball from time to time, so now you want what every golfer wants…More distance. One of the most important things your irons should do is help you get greater distance with your shots so that you can hit more greens in regulation and begin putting for more birdies.

Feel

The feel of a club is what the club “feels” like when you strike the ball. This is important psychologically, in terms of improvement, and because you get to the point that you know how a club should feel when you hit it correctly. The feel of an iron is important because it helps you know how you hit it, how to hit it differently if needed, and gives you confidence in your game.

Forgiveness

Forgiveness is important, especially for low handicap golfers, you will mishit the ball from time to time. As important as the sweet spot of an iron is, the forgiveness of the club head around the sweet spot is equally important. The forgiveness of a club can be the difference between multiple strokes per round and especially for a mid handicapper.

Control

If you are like me, distance is not the issue. I like to use good form in my swing, but I also like to hit the ball hard, and control can be an issue. Most irons made for mid handicap golfers have an offset hosel and a cavity back to help control your shot and keep those slices and hooks to a minimum.

Differences Between Low, Mid, and High Handicap Golfers When Purchasing Irons

Stay away from words like “tour preferred” or “tour pro” in the name. These clubs are usually for low handicap golfers and they are generally the least forgiving with the smallest sweet spot. The main differences between the low handicap and mid handicap irons are that the low handicap clubs have a smaller sweet spot, standard hosels, and are usually blades rather than cavity back irons. The bottom line is that low handicap irons are made for players who can already get the ball off of the ground, do not need a large sweet spot, and have the ability to play the shots that they want without help from the club. You are not quite there yet, but you will be.

On the other hand, high handicap players need every advantage the club can offer just to get the ball off of the ground, to help correct errors like hitting the ground first, and help keep away from the dreaded slice that is so common in high handicappers.

Hopefully you’re swing doesn’t look like any of these either:

Irons for beginners take away from distance and feel, and focus mostly on inconsistent contact and forgiveness. You are past this point and these clubs will only hold you back from hitting more greens in regulation and lowering your score.

Two Things That Give Mid Handicappers the Forgiveness They Need

Shaft

Your irons shafts are extremely important and they come in either steel or graphite. As a general rule, for irons, steel shafts are the better choice for the large majority of golfers, but going to your local pro shop and getting your swing analyzed is highly recommended. Steel is a little heavier and usually improves feel and control as compared to the lighter and more flexible graphite shafts. The key to choosing the right shaft is that most golfers do not need extra flex on their irons so a regular to stiff steel shaft is usually ideal.

Club Head Design

There are also two club head design options, cavity back or muscle back (blade) irons. Cavity back irons have considerably more forgiveness both from the ground and the ball itself because of how they are weighted. Blade irons have the vast majority of their weight directly behind the sweet spot with the assumption that the player will hit this spot consistently. For mid handicappers, this is not always the case and having a more weighted perimeter can save you on those slight mishits that are still fairly common.

The Best Golf Irons for Mid Handicappers Reviewed

Mizuno JPX 919 Forged

Too often, mid handicap golfers make the move away from cavity back irons before they are ready.

These Mizuno irons are the perfect step between cavity back and blades as their “U” shape sole does not dig into the turf but still looks more like a muscle back iron. These irons make it easier to shape your shot as they are not weighted one way or the other so that your swing does the work. They have the shape and look of a professional quality muscle back club with the give and forgiveness of the bigger club heads.

Pros

  • Soft feel and very smooth hitting iron
  • A great sound from the club when you hit it on the sweet spot
  • While they look like muscle back irons, they are actually weighted around the edges of the club for greater forgiveness.
  • When addressing the ball, the look of the club gives confidence and helps with alignment
  • It is a shot-shapers club

Cons

  • One of the least forgiving clubs on this list.
  • The matte finish will wear off over time and this can affect the effectiveness of the club.
  • These are one of the higher priced sets

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Cobra King Forged TEC

The stainless steel face of the Cobra King TEC adds ball speed and distance to a great looking golf club.

The satin finish is the most durable in Cobra’s line and just looks good on the golf course. These are game improvement irons and the club heads are a little larger than most of the other irons in this review. There is also an electronic sensor in the grip that allows you to take detailed stats and analysis of your iron game throughout the round.

Pros

  • Tungsten weighted sole for a lower center of gravity that leads to higher ball trajectory and more forgiveness
  • It is one of the highest flying irons on the market
  • The electronic data collection can really help you improve certain aspects of your game
  • A high strength forged stainless steel gives you greater ball speed off of the club for greater distance
  • A carbon medallion helps to dampen vibration giving better feel to the irons

Cons

  • The bigger face takes away from the look at address and looks more like a beginner club than a mid handicapper’s
  • The weighting and offset hosel make it more difficult to shape your shot
  • You have to customize if you need graphite shafts

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Callaway Apex

Callaway has been making top of the line drivers for many years and this offering does not disappoint.

The clubs look good at address, have the feel of a cavity back with the look of a blade, and have some of the best shafts on the market. These clubs look, perform, and sound like a professional set but they include many of the game improvement features that a player who is looking to break 80 for the first time needs.

Pros

  • More shaft options without customization
  • Face flexes and rebounds more than most irons which provide greater feel and distance
  • A blade shape with the advantages of a cavity back club
  • Callaway has been on the top of the list when it comes to irons for years
  • A crisp and clean sound off of the club face
  • Average price for a set of high quality clubs
  • These clubs shoot straight
  • They are made specifically for mid handicappers

Cons

  • Not made for hard swingers
  • Mishits can be hard to gauge because the clubs can be too forgiving
  • It is more difficult to shape your shot

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TaylorMade P790

The P790s are the most versatile club in the TaylorMade lineup.

They perform extremely well in distance and accuracy, and these are the two key elements needed in your iron game. Finesse is important, but that is learned and built into your game through experience, these clubs can help you reach the green in regulation. These clubs look good at address, but they are a little larger looking than the other clubs being reviewed.

Pros

  • A great price for a great set of clubs
  • Multiple shaft selection without customization
  • An ultra thin face with high strength carbon steel give incredible ball speed and distance to these irons
  • Hollow construction for better weight placement which adds to trajectory and straightness
  • Glides through the turf to provide a high launch

Cons

  • Made more for power and accuracy than finesse so wedges from a different brand may make sense
  • They look like a cavity back while many others on this list look tour clubs.

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Titleist 718 AP3

The heads of the Titleist 718 AP3 are a little larger than previous offerings, and this greatly appeals to most mid handicappers.

At address, however, the clubs look more like muscle backs even with the larger heads but they maintain the advantages of a cavity back iron. One of the great things about this set is that, while they are made for the mid handicapper, they will service low handicappers well also and can be used even as the golfer improves their game. The bottom line is that these are Titleist clubs, and Titleist golf clubs are some of the highest quality clubs on the market.

Pros

  • Professional looking clubs that perform as well as they look
  • Some game improvement characteristics, but they are made for better players
  • They greatly improve both distance and accuracy
  • They are Titleists

Cons

  • A very expensive set of irons
  • These are made for the better hitting and scoring mid handicappers, so make sure you are ready for them

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Our Choice

The Mizuno JPX 919 Forged are my choice for the best set of irons for a mid handicapper. Their look, performance, feel, and incredible list of features make them my choice for the golfer looking to break 80 for the first time.

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When you are purchasing irons you want distance, feel, forgiveness, and a feeling of confidence that each time you lineup your shot it is going to perform the way you want it to. The Mizuno JPX 919 Forged does all of this and more and will help take your game to the next level.

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